FAQs My LOLER

We know that you may have some questions about My LOLER. Below you’ll find answers to some of the more commonly asked questions about Lifting equipment.

LOLER – an abbreviation for (Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998). It is mostly referred to as the LOLER 98 regulations which came into force on 5 of December 1998. It applies to any lifting equipment including any attachment used for supporting or fixing it. LOLER regulations apply to a robust range of equipment which includes Cranes, fork lifts, scissor lifts, drive trolleys, Pallet trucks and mobile elevating work platforms. It does not apply to escalators which are covered by another regulation body know as Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations.

Lifting equipment, also known as lifting gear, is a general term for any equipment that can be used to lift loads. Its primary function is lift and lower loads. This includes jacks, fork lifts, hydraulic lifting pads, air lift bags, and cranes. They can be dangerous to use, so they are subject of safety regulations in most countries.

Nevertheless, equipment that lifts as an incidental aspect of its main function is not regarded to be lifting equipment.

Lifting equipment, also known as lifting gear, is a general term for any equipment that can be used to lift loads. Its primary function is lift and lower loads. This includes jacks, fork lifts, hydraulic lifting pads, air lift bags, and cranes. They can be dangerous to use, so they are subject of safety regulations in most countries.

Nevertheless, equipment that lifts as an incidental aspect of its main function is not regarded to be lifting equipment.

A lifting accessory is not a permanent part of the load but it can be used to attach a load to the lifting equipment. They include ropes, chains, hooks, eyebolts and shackles.

The term “appointed person” as used in this context refer to a person who is qualified and competent to handle a lifting operation. Regulation 8 of LOLER requires that all lifting operations should be meticulously supervised and carried out safely. To this end, the person must have a theoretical and practical knowledge in carrying out lifting operations.

There are certain requirements that must be met before equipment can be used for lifting. In this case, you can use an excavator for lifting if

  • It is permitted by the original manufacturer
  • It has been subjected to thorough examination
  • It is used in accordance to manufacturer’s instructions

LOLER regulations apply to the safety of land-based workers and members of the public who may be affected by the lifting activities. It applies to ships when the crew is working in a way which might be detrimental to others.

A memorandum of understanding (MOU) which summarizes how LOLER is applied to situations involving ship’s lifting equipment can be established between the authorities to ensure compliance.

Yes. Thorough Examination of lifting equipment or accessories must take place every 6-12 months if the equipment is used to lift people. This timeframe requirement is exercised when there is no formal “examination scheme” drawn up by a competent person. Lifting equipment will require a thorough examination if any of the following occur:

  • An accident or a dangerous occurrence
  • A mechanical damage or significant change in condition
  • Long periods of inaction

Before first use, the equipment must be examined by a competent person to ensure that the assembly is safe and correct.

Although you would imagine the owner of any item of equipment would be the person responcible for ensuring any legal Inspections, the health and safety at work act 1974 clearly states that :

2. General duties of employers to their employees.

(1)It shall be the duty of every employer to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all his employees.